Tuesday, 22 October 2013

Web Roundup

LINKS

" Don’t use a devotion to historical accuracy (whatever that means) as the excuse for writing women as less than full-fledged people. Don’t think that because women in the past lived lives different from their male contemporaries (where they had dowries, worked primarily as homemakers, provided a majority of childcare, couldn’t own/inherit property in their own names) that they had no hopes, dreams, desires, or ambitions of their own. Don’t think that because some accounts of history said women were forbidden from doing something that women didn’t do it anyway."

Read the whole article, it is amazing!  http://the-toast.net/2013/10/10/revisiting-ever-after/

These forgotten places are just so magical!

This faerie is just magical and I want my own! Watch the video: Wire Sculpture by Fantasywire.

This man thought he had a little storage space under the floor. What he found was so much bigger!

I know this so well, I often have my camera on self timer to take pictures, and staying still for ten seconds is really hard, especially if you are trying to hold a pose!


When I referred in the past to wanting to write strong women, this is basically what I meant, sometimes things mean more when said in their entirety than boiled down to a single word, but it is hard to remember all that. I do love dark, damaged, sarcastic characters, I hate the happy go lucky, perky characters we get in a lot of stories and the moment. I want sensitive people at odds with the world, like myself.

http://aquestionofcharacter.tumblr.com/post/63388177920/consultingpiskies-they-are-all-okay-and-all



 A fairy tale book display in a shop at the Efteling Theme Park in Kaatsheuvel, The Netherland.

Ok, this is hilarious!


This is gorgeous, from:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Renovating-the-Ruin/150796961728962





As a child, I loved carousels (the sort with horses, not the sort in Logan's Run, hee hee, showing my science fiction nerdiness there) I would love to go on one again sometime!

http://twonerdyhistorygirls.blogspot.com.au/2013/10/a-historic-carousel-still-turns.html

10 TV characters who never change their clothes (and why)

I still really want one of these, maybe for Christmas:
Victorian Tear Bottles.

“The tear bottle tradition has endured for more than 3,000 years. Tear bottles, or lachrymatory, were common in ancient middle Eastern societies. Even today they are still produced in that region.

Tear bottles were prevalent in ancient Roman times, when mourners filled small glass vials or cups with tears and placed them in burial tombs as symbols of love and respect.

Sometimes women were even paid to cry into “cups”, as they walked along the mourning procession. Those crying the loudest and producing the most tears received the most compensation, or so the legend goes. The more anguish and tears produced, the more important and valued the deceased person was perceived to be.

Tear bottles reappeared during the Victorian period of the 19th century, when those mourning the loss of loved ones would collect their tears in bottles ornately decorated with silver and pewter. Special stoppers allowed the tears to evaporate. When the tears were gone, the mourning period would end.”

The tear bottles with the shape of cigars were more appropriate for men to have them in their pockets.
Victorian Tear Bottles.

“The tear bottle tradition has endured for more than 3,000 years. Tear bottles, or lachrymatory, were common in ancient middle Eastern societies. Even today they are still produced in that region. 

Tear bottles were prevalent in ancient Roman times, when mourners filled small glass vials or cups with tears and placed them in burial tombs as symbols of love and respect.

 Sometimes women were even paid to cry into “cups”, as they walked along the mourning procession. Those crying the loudest and producing the most tears received the most compensation, or so the legend goes. The more anguish and tears produced, the more important and valued the deceased person was perceived to be.

Tear bottles reappeared during the Victorian period of the 19th century, when those mourning the loss of loved ones would collect their tears in bottles ornately decorated with silver and pewter. Special stoppers allowed the tears to evaporate. When the tears were gone, the mourning period would end.”

The tear bottles with the shape of cigars were more appropriate for men to have them in their pockets.

From  https://www.facebook.com/EverythingVictorian?hc_location=stream   

Upon a Midnight Dreary: Review for Pushin Daisies: A Mortuary Novelty Shop

Dark wonderful art by Kate Macdowell on Haute Macabre

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

10 lovely flowers which only bloom at night
37 ways to proudly wear your love for books

Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean: How we made the Sandman

DIY



 #DIY tip
Replace the light bulbs in an old chandelier with inexpensive solar lights. Hang it from a tree branch. You'll have gorgeous outdoor lighting without having to provide electricity.


Possibly the most fun DIY idea ever! Adding monsters to thrift store paintings!
The Dreamstress: Tutorial: How to sew flat lining

My Hands Made It: Dyeing Lace

My Hands Made It: Doily Lantern Tutorial

My Hands Made It: Lavender and Honey Ice Cream

My Hands Made It: DIY Fabric Bouquet

Undercover Dress Up Lover: How to add lace trim to a skirt

Useful for those interested in Lolita fashion, a list of what can and can't be washed.

How to make a repeat pattern (for fabric)

3 comments:

  1. Beautiful post. Beautiful blog. Now let me go explore those links! <3

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  2. Oh wow, thank you so much for all those links, I have opened a bunch of them in new tabs and I can't wait to go through them! I love tear bottles too, these days we are so ashamed of tears that we hide to cry because we are expected to be strong and unattatched. I like the victorian way of mourning better!

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  3. Aww, that thing about photographs is adorable. :)

    ReplyDelete